Johns Hopkins seeks 2,500 blood samples for Inflammatory Bowel gene activation study

Researchers at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore are conducting a major study to find out why Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) (Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) occurs in individuals and in families.

IBD is strongly genetic but the complexities of inheritance and environmental triggers are little understood. Recently the investigators and other researchers found a gene (DNA) that when changed, gives people a higher risk for developing IBD – or other inflammatory diseases like IBD.

By doing this research, scientists and doctors will study the cells in the blood to see how the gene-change affects the way the blood cells' immune system works – and ultimately to identify biomarkers for predictive and therapeutic purposes.

Overall, their goal is to bank and analyze the blood of 2,500 people who have IBD and/or are first degree blood relatives of individuals with IBD (ages 5 and older).

IBD patients are primarily recruited at the Johns Hopkins inpatient and outpatient units, but individuals may contact them by phone, mail or email.

See the listing for this just-listed project ( for more detail and contact information.

The principal investigator is Dr. Steven Brant, MD, Director of John’s Hopkins’ Meyerhoff Inflammatory Bowel Disease Genetics Laboratory.

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