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Knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors regarding Lyme disease prevention among Connecticut residents, 1999-2004.

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Abstract

Lyme disease, caused by the tick-transmitted bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi, is the most common vector-borne
disease in the United States. We surveyed residents of three Connecticut health districts to evaluate the impact of intensive community-wide education programs on knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors to prevent
Lyme disease. Overall, 84% of respondents reported that they knew a lot or some about
Lyme disease, and 56% felt that they were very or somewhat likely to get
Lyme disease in the coming year. During 2002-2004, the percentage of respondents who reported always performing tick checks increased by 7% and the percentage of respondents who reported always using repellents increased by 5%, whereas the percentage of respondents who reported avoiding wooded areas and tucking pants into socks decreased. Overall, 99% of respondents used personal protective behaviors to prevent
Lyme disease. In comparison, 65% of respondents reported using environmental tick controls, and increased use of environmental tick controls was observed in only one health district. The majority of respondents were unwilling to spend more than $100 on tick control. These results provide guidance for the development of effective
Lyme disease prevention programs by identifying measures most likely to be adopted by residents of
Lyme disease endemic communities.

Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2008 Dec;8(6):769-76. doi: 10.1089/vbz.2007.0221. Research Support, U.S. Gov’t, P.H.S.

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