Lower risk of mortality over thirteen year period in association with higher levels of vitamin D

Reprinted with the kind permission of Life Extension.

September 19 2014. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition published an article on September 17, 2014 that revealed a lower risk of dying over a 13 year average follow-up period among those whose serum vitamin D levels were highest in comparison with those whose were lowest.
Researchers at the University of Cambridge measured 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels in stored serum samples from 14,641 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, who were between the ages of 42 and 82 years from 1997 to 2000.  Subjects were followed until December 2012.
For men and women whose serum vitamin D levels were among the highest one-fifth of participants at an average of 36 ng/mL or more, there was a 27% lower adjusted risk of dying from all causes over follow-up in comparison with those whose levels were among the lowest fifth at less than 12 ng/mL. Those whose vitamin D levels were highest had a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease and other causes, and cardiovascular events, respiratory disease events and fractures were also reduced.
“This 13-year prospective study in a free-living, middle-aged and older British population provides additional support for the hypothesis that vitamin D status is associated with a range of important health outcomes including respiratory disease, cardiovascular disease, fractures, and total mortality,” Kay-Tee Khaw and colleagues write. “Only 1% of the population had concentrations greater than 120 nmol/L [48 ng/mL]. Within this observed population range, there was no evidence for increased mortality for 25(OH)D greater than 90 [36 ng/mL] or greater than 120 nmol/L [48 ng/mL], suggesting that a moderate increase in population mean concentrations may have a potential health benefit for preventing deficiency without increasing risk.”

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