Lowered oxidative stress and reduced DNA damage linked to specific supplements

Reprinted with kind permission of Life Extension.

August 7, 2013. A study described in an article published online on August 6, 2013 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention reveals an ability for several dietary supplements to help prevent oxidative stress and DNA damage.

The current study utilized data from 209 men and women who participated in the VITamins And Lifestyle (VITAL) biomarker study, which enrolled residents of western Washington between 2000 and 2001. Interviews and questionnaires administered following enrollment ascertained the frequency of use for glucosamine, chondroitin, fish oil, methylsulfonylmethane (MSM), coenzyme Q10, ginseng, garlic, ginkgo and saw palmetto. Measurement of urinary 8-isoprostane and prostaglandin F2 alpha (PGF2 alpha) assessed oxidative stress levels, and blood samples were analyzed for white blood cell DNA damage and DNA repair capacity.

Researchers Elizabeth D. Kantor of Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and her colleagues found a reduction in urinary PDF2 alpha, indicating lower amounts of oxidative stress, among those who reported consuming 14 or more tablets glucosamine or chondroitin per week. For glucosamine users, the reduction was 40% lower, and for chondroitin users, the reduction was 47% lower in comparison with nonusers. The use of fiber supplements was associated with a 43% reduction in PDF2 alpha, and for those who used coenzyme Q10, there was a 58% lower level of DNA damage compared to nonusers.

“Our results suggest that glucosamine, chondroitin, and fiber supplements are associated with reduced oxidative stress, while CoQ10 supplementation was associated with reduced DNA damage,” the authors conclude. “Further research is needed to better understand the associations between use of these popular supplements and oxidative stress/DNA damage, as oxidative stress and DNA damage have been suggested to play a role in several diseases. Our results provide evidence of a potential mechanism by which these supplements may affect disease risk, warranting further research on these potential preventives.”

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