Multivitamin and dietary supplements, body weight and appetite: Results from a cross-sectional and a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled study – Source: British Journal of Nutrition, Nov 2007

Two studies were conducted:

n To compare characteristics of consumers and non-consumers of vitamin and/or dietary supplements (study 1)

n And to assess the effect of a multivitamin and mineral supplementation during a weight-reducing program (study 2).

Body weight and composition, energy expenditure, and Three-Factor Eating Questionnaire scores were compared between consumers and non-consumers of micronutrients and/or dietary supplements in the Québec Family Study (study 1). In study 2, these variables and appetite ratings (visual analogue scales) were measured in 45 obese non-consumers of supplements randomly assigned to a double-blind 15-week energy restriction ( – 2930 kJ/d) combined with a placebo or with a multivitamin and mineral supplement.

Compared with non-consumers, male consumers of vitamin and/or dietary supplements had a lower body weight (P < 0.01), fat mass (P < 0.05), BMI (P < 0.05), and a tendency for greater resting energy expenditure (P = 0.06). In women, the same differences were observed but not to a statistically significant extent. In addition, female supplements consumers had lower disinhibition and hunger scores (P < 0.05).

In study 2, body weight was significantly decreased after the weight-loss intervention (P < 0.001) with no difference between treatment groups. However, fasting and postprandial appetite ratings were significantly reduced in multivitamin and mineral-supplemented women (P < 0.05).

Usual vitamin and/or dietary supplements consumption and multivitamin and mineral supplementation during a weight-reducing program seems to have an appetite-related effect in women. However, lower body weight and fat were more detectable in male than in female vitamin and/or dietary supplements consumers.

Source: British Journal of Nutrition. Nov 2007. 1:1-11 [E-pub ahead of print]. PMID: 17977472, by Major GC, Doucet E, Jacqmain M, St-Onge M, Bouchard C, Tremblay A. Division of Kinesiology, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Laval University, Québec, Canada.

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