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Neuroborreliosis with extrapyramidal symptoms: a case report.

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Abstract

The
disease of
Lyme is a tick-borne infection. It involves skin, the nervous system, joints and the heart. Spirochaeta Borrelia burgdorferi is the etiologic agent of the
disease. In the majority of cases, clinical symptoms, like migrating erythema, occur from 3 to 30 days, sometimes to 3 months after a bite from a tick. The early disseminated infection involves multiple migrating erythema, neuroborreliosis, arthritis, myocarditis and other organ-related symptoms. The late stage of chronic infection involves chronic atrophic leg dermatitis, neurological and rheumatological symptoms, and other organ-related symptoms which persist for above 12 months. The diagnosis of the
disease of
Lyme is based upon specific clinical symptoms confirmed by serologic tests. The two-step diagnostic protocol including the ELISA method, confirmed by the Western-blot test, is optimal. The present article describes a case of a 59-year-old man, a computer specialist, who often spends his free time walking in woods for recreation, and who was bitten by a tick 3 years before hospitalization. The bite resulted in migrating erythema that subsided without antimicrobial treatment. In spite of this, the man had not changed his hobby exposing himself to bites from ticks. One year later, multiple migrating erythema and extrapyramidalis symptoms appeared without any other organ malfunctions. In the current year, the patient was admitted to the Infectious Diseases Hospital, and received antibiotics (ceftriaxon) with following neurological improvement. Several months later, extrapyramidal symptoms increased. On the day of admission to the hospital, the neurologic examination showed abnormalities of upper and lower limbs movements (propulsive walking and the right lower leg traction), the right hand tremor, pouts of the face, and sleepiness.

Pol Arch Med Wewn. 2008 May;118(5):314-7. Case Reports

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