Neuropsychological Performance in Persons with Chronic Fatigue – Source: Psychosomatic Medicine, Jul 7, 2008

Objective: To examine the neuropsychological function characterized in subjects with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) at the same time controlling for relevant confounding factors.[Broadly, "neuropsychology" addresses relationships between brain structure & function, information processing, behavior.]

CFS is associated with symptoms of neuropsychological dysfunction. Objective measures of neuropsychological performance have yielded inconsistent results possibly due to sample selection bias, diagnostic heterogeneity, comorbid psychiatric disorders, and medication usage.


  • CFS subjects (n = 58) and well controls (n = 104) from a population-based sample were evaluated, using standardized symptom severity criteria.
  • Subjects who had major psychiatric disorders or took medications known to influence cognition were excluded.
  • Neuropsychological function was measured using the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB). [A set of computer-administered tests to examine different components of cognitive function.]

Results: Compared with controls:

  • CFS subjects exhibited significant decreases in motor speed as measured in the simple and five-choice movement segments of the CANTAB reaction time task.
  • CFS subjects also exhibited alterations in working memory as manifested by a less efficient search strategy on the spatial working memory task, fewer % correct responses on the spatial recognition task, and prolonged latency to a correct response on the pattern recognition task.

A significantly higher percentage of CFS subjects versus controls exhibited evidence of neuropsychological impairment (defined by performance 1 standard deviation below the CANTAB normative mean) in tasks of motor speed and spatial working memory. Impairment in CFS subjects versus control subjects ranged from 20% versus 4.8% in five-choice movement time (p = .002) to 27.8% versus 10.6% in search strategy on the spatial working memory task (p = .006).

Conclusions: These results confirm and quantify alterations in motor speed and working memory in CFS subjects independent of comorbid psychiatric disease and medication usage.

Source: Psychosomatic Medicine, Jul 7, 2008 [Epub ahead of print] PMID: 18606722, by Majer M, Welberg LA, Capuron L, Miller AH, Pagnoni G, Reeves WC. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta; Chronic Viral Diseases Branch, Coordinating Center for Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia. [E-mail:]

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)

Leave a Reply