New Drug Therapy Shows Potential for Rheumatoid Arthritis Sufferers

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A new drug called, CDP870 shows promising results as a new potential anti-TNF therapy, and a potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. This is according to recent study presented at the American College of Rheumatology Annual Scientific Meeting.

Researchers conducted the study involving 204 patients with active RA who had had an inadequate response to a number of previous therapies. Patients were given either CDP870 or placebo by subcutaneous (under the skin) injection once per month for three months.

The study results suggest that CDP870 is well tolerated and effective in treating the signs and symptoms of RA. Study participants began experiencing benefits within one week and maintained them throughout the three-month study period. The highest dose provided substantial benefit as assessed by standard ACR criteria with 60% of patients demonstrating significant clinical improvement and 40% exhibiting an extremely good response.

“These results are encouraging because they suggest that CDP870 may provide RA patients with efficacy comparable to currently available therapies, along with the convenience of dosing once monthly,” said Edward Keystone, MD, Professor of Medicine, University of Toronto and an investigator in the study.

Rheumatoid arthritis is a debilitating disease that affects 1 percent of the adult population. It is a chronic disease that causes pain, stiffness, swelling, damage, and loss of function in many joints as well as inflammation in other body organs. About 75 percent of cases occur in women. It usually develops during childbearing years but can also begin in late adulthood.