Non-nociceptive aspects of persistent musculoskeletal pain

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Persistent pain is often difficult to understand and to treat.

Clinical and neurophysiological evidence is offered,

suggesting that this often occurs because persistent pain is

partially or wholly of non-nociceptive afferent origin. The

concept of non-nociceptive pain and the potential roles of

proprioceptive afferents in the production of non-nociceptive

pain are particularly emphasized. It is suggested that

non-nociceptive pain is often an important component of pain

associated with peripheral and central neuropathy,

fibromyalgia, trauma-induced pain, idiopathic low back pain,

and chronic regional pain syndrome. Non-nociceptive pain is

often dependent upon central sensitization induced by prior

or ongoing nociception. Therapeutic methods which minimize

nociceptive afferent activity are important in the prevention

and/or elimination of often intractable non-nociceptive pain.

Kramis RC, Roberts WJ, Gillette RG

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