Self-reported Vitamin Supplementation in Early Pregnancy and Risk of Miscarriage –Source: American Journal of Epidemiology, Apr 16, 2009

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Miscarriage is a common and poorly understood adverse pregnancy outcome. In this study, the authors sought to evaluate the relation between self-reported use of prenatal vitamins in early pregnancy and the risk of miscarriage.

Between 2000 and 2008, 4,752 US women were prospectively enrolled in Right From the Start. Information about vitamin use was obtained from a first-trimester interview. Discrete-time hazard models were used, candidate confounders were assessed, and the following variables were included in the model: study site, maternal age, gravidity, marital status, education, race/ethnicity, smoking, and use of progesterone in early pregnancy.

• Approximately 95% of participants reported use of vitamins during early pregnancy.

• A total of 524 women had a miscarriage.

• In the final adjusted model, any use of vitamins during pregnancy was associated with decreased odds of miscarriage (odds ratio = 0.43, 95% confidence interval: 0.30, 0.60) in comparison with no exposure. [Note: an odds ratio of 1.0 would represent no difference in likelihood of miscarriage. The 0.43 odds ratio indicates an average 57% risk reduction among those who used some vitamins vs. those who used none.]

These results should be viewed in the context of a potentially preventive biologic mechanism mitigated by possible confounding by healthy behaviors and practices that are also associated with vitamin supplement use during pregnancy.

Source: American Journal of Epidemiology, Apr 16, 2009. PMID: 19372214, by Hasan R, Olshan AF, Herring AH, Savitz DA, Siega-Riz AM, Hartmann KE. Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA. [E-mail: reem_hasan@med.unc.edu]

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