Small-World Network Analysis of Cortical Connectivity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Using Quantitative EEG

By Mark A. Zinn et al.

Abstract

 
The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between complex brain networks in people with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and neurocognitive impairment. Quantitative EEG (qEEG) recordings were taken from 14 people with CFS and 15 healthy controls (HCs) during an eye-closed resting condition. Exact low resolution electromagnetic tomography (eLORETA) was used to estimate cortical sources and perform a functional connectivity analysis. The graph theory approach was used to characterize network representations for each participant and derive the “small-worldness” index, a measure of the overall homeostatic balance between local and long-distance connectedness.

Results showed that small-worldness for the delta band was significantly lower for patients with CFS compared to HCs. In addition, delta small-worldness was negatively associated with neurocognitive impairment scores on the DePaul Symptom Questionnaire (DSQ). Finally, delta small-worldness indicated a greater risk of complex brain network inefficiency for the CFS group. These results suggest that CFS pathology may be functionally disruptive to small-world networks. In turn, small-world characteristics might serve as a neurophysiological indicator for confirming a biological basis of cognitive symptoms, treatment outcome, and neurophysiological status of people with CFS.

Source: Zinn, M. A., Zinn, M. L., & Jason, L. A. (2017). Small-world network analysis of cortical connectivity in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome using quantitative EEG. NeuroRegulation, 4(3–4), 125–137. http://dx.doi.org/10.15540/nr.4.3-4.125 (Full article)

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