The Benefits of Probiotics

Billions of bacteria live in each of us. If we could weigh all the bacteria in the gastrointestinal tract, it would amount to about three and one-half pounds.

Divided into several hundred species, some are good, some are not. Simply put, illness develops when the “bad” bacteria outnumber the “good” bacteria. To remain healthy, our systems must be in balance, with enough beneficial bacteria to keep the bad guy in check. What can we do to achieve the balance? Probiotics could be the answer.

According to Natasha Trenev, who authored the book Probiotics, “Probiotics are a category of dietary supplements consisting of beneficial microorganisms. They limit the proliferation of disease-causing microorganisms by competitive exclusion in the gastrointestinal tract of man and animals.”

Probably the best known probiotic is L. Acidophilus, an inhabitant of the small intestine. Studies have been conducted at the University of Nebraska on L. Acidophilus for over 65 years. According to research, which has been documented in internationally renowned journals, L. Acidophilus:

Produces enzymes such as proteases, which help digest proteins and lipases to digest fat

Improves the digestibility of food for humans

Helps in the alleviation of lactose intolerance caused by the deficiency of the enzyme lactase

Inhibits the growth of 23 toxic-producing microorganisms

Supplementation with probiotics such as L. Acidophilus can be beneficial for any person interested in improving nutrition and digestion.

Go to: ProDophilus

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