The effect of Qigong on Fibromyalgia (FMS): A controlled randomized study – Source: Disability and Rehabilitation, Jun 15, 2007

Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a 7-week Qigong [pronounced “chee gong”] intervention on subjects with Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS).

Methods: The study was a controlled randomized study with repeated measures. Fifty-seven FMS female subjects were randomly assigned to an intervention group (n = 29) or a waiting-list control group (n = 28). After completion of the experimental part, the control group received the same intervention. Collection of data was made at pre- and post-treatment and at 4-month follow-up for both groups.

Results: During the experimental part of the study, significant improvements were found for the intervention group, at post-treatment, regarding different aspects of pain and psychological health and distress. Almost identical results were found for the combined group. At 4-month follow-up, the majority of these results were either maintained or improved.

Conclusion: The overall results show that Qigong has positive and reliable effects regarding FMS. A high degree of completion, 93%, and contentment with the intervention further support the potential of the treatment. The results of the study are encouraging and suggest that Qigong intervention could be a useful complement to medical treatment for subjects with FMS.

[Note: to access information about Qigong, you can go online to find Qigong DVDs and Qigong Books ]

Source: Disability and Rehabilitation. 2007 Jun 15; 1-9 [E-publication ahead of print] PMID: 17852292, by Haak T, Scott B. Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Uppsala, Sweden.

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One thought on “The effect of Qigong on Fibromyalgia (FMS): A controlled randomized study – Source: Disability and Rehabilitation, Jun 15, 2007”

  1. sallynoname says:

    It is good to hear that the benefical effects of Qigong are at last being looked at. I began Qigong ( or Chi Gung, Chi Kung etc as it is also known) shortly after developing CFS/FM and have found it extremely helpful over the years. A difficulty is that I cannot access a class in my home area. There are plenty of Tai Chi classes that include a bit of Qigong, but I find they do not really suit my needs, as the memory requirements of Tai Chi are too great. it would be wonderful if Qigong became more popular in its own right as a wonderful aid to improving health.

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