Tip of the Day

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According to Kent Holtorf, M.D., “CFS and FM patients will often have a number of thyroid abnormalities including a low free T3, a high reverse T3, and a low TSH. These abnormal ratios are not usually discovered using the standard laboratory interpretation of hypothyroidism. When CFS and FM patients are treated with thyroid, they are almost always under-dosed because their pituitary dysfunction results in their TSH becoming quickly suppressed, which normally indicates too much thyroid. Because these patients have pituitary dysfunction, one must forget about the TSH and not treat based on this parameter. These patients can also have a thyroid resistance syndrome. This has not been a well-accepted concept by general mainstream medicine and many refuse to believe it exists because the exact mechanism has not been elucidated, but this a real phenomenon. In fact, in a recent issue of International Journal of Medical Research, a major peer reviewed medical journal, a patient was described that required 10 times the normal dose of thyroid intravenously before her symptoms would resolve. This resistance usually improves as the patient gets better and they subsequently need less thyroid.” (Source: www.ImmuneSupport.com. Read complete article at ttp://www.immunesupport.com/library/showarticle.cfm/id/4532)