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Could the tilt-test formula be a diagnostic marker for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS)? Researchers in Israel believe so. Researchers in Israel have tested the haemodynamic instability score (HIS), a formula that uses measurements taken during a head-up tilt test, to see if it can accurately distinguish patients with CFS from controls. The HIS relects blood pressure and heart rate changes during the tilt test, which is used to determine the functioning of a patient's autonomic nervous system. A majority of people with CFS display some degree of autonomic dysfunction. A prospective controlled study of 40 CFS patients compared their HIS scores to 278 non-CFS subjects with conditions that included FM, syncope, generalized anxiety disorder, essential hypertension, non-CFS chronic fatigue and Familial Mediterranean Fever. 59 healthy subjects were also compared. The results showed that the HIS was an effective tool in differentiating CFS patients from the other study participants. Specifically, 90.3% of the CFS patients who completed the tilt test scored above the threshold of HIS. The authors write that their results suggest a definable, CFS-characteristic autonomic dysfunction may exist. Study reference: Naschitz JE et al. "The head-up tilt test with haemodynamic instability score in diagnosing chronic fatigue syndrome." Q J Med. 2003; 96:133-142. (Source: The CFS Research Review, Spring 2003. Published by the CFIDS Association of America, Inc.)

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