Trial findings help explain omega-3’s anti-inflammatory effect

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

Reprinted with the kind permission of Life Extension.

October 16 2017. Findings from a randomized trial reported on October 10, 2017 in Medical Principles and Practice may help provide a better understanding of the anti-inflammatory benefit of omega 3 fatty acids.

“The prevalence of both type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity are increasing worldwide, supporting the possibility of their close relationship. The abnormalities in the inflammatory pathways and the dysfunctions of adipose tissue are linked,” write Maryam Mazaherioun of Tehran University of Medical sciences and colleagues. “Therefore, improving inflammatory situations probably could be a new approach in the management of type 2 diabetes and its complications.”

The double-blind trial included 88 type 2 diabetics who were given 1800 milligrams (mg) of the omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acid EPA plus 900 mg of the omega 3 DHA, or a placebo daily for 10 weeks. Serum lipids, resistin (a hormone that elevates LDL cholesterol) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were measured before and after the treatment period. (Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 is a chemokine overexpressed in insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity that plays a role in inflammatory pathways.)

While only a nonsignificant reduction in resistin occurred among participants who received omega 3 fatty acids, MCP-1 levels significantly declined while remaining unchanged in the placebo group. Atherogenic index (a marker of cardiovascular disease) and triglycerides also improved in participants who received omega 3.

“The present study revealed that the anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 PUFAs might be mediated by targeting MCP-1,” the authors conclude. “More studies are needed to explain the exact molecular mechanisms involved in such beneficial roles of omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, particularly its effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) gene expression and with different doses and duration of supplementation.”

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...



Leave a Reply