Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials [inner ear balance control] in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome – Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, Feb 22, 2010

[Note: The inner ear controls balance (via the vestibular system). The VEMP assessment is a computerized test that measures portions of this balance system in patients with symptoms of dizziness. It involves raising or turning the head sharply as directed.]

Objective: To assess vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.

Methods: Twenty-four patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (two men and 22 women) and 21 female controls were included in the study. All patients underwent vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing.

Results: Statistical comparison of fibromyalgia patients with control subjects showed a significant difference with respect to n23 latencies and interpeak latencies (p 0.05).

Conclusions: Although patients with fibromyalgia syndrome generally have subjective neurotological symptoms, clinical and laboratory assessments usually fail to detect any objective abnormality.

However, it is possible to detect abnormalities on vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing in such patients, indicating dysfunction in the vestibulospinal pathway, possibly in the saccule.

Elongation of the n23 latency and of the interpeak latency of waves p13-n23, during vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing, may be a useful, objective indicator demonstrating neurotological involvement in fibromyalgia syndrome patients.

Future research investigating the mechanisms of this latency elongation may help increase understanding of the pathogenesis of fibromyalgia syndrome.

Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, Feb 22, 2010; 1-6. PMID: 20170583, by Bayazit YA, Celenk F, Gunduz AG, Gunduz B, Ondag N, Meray J. Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Faculty of Medicine, Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey.

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One thought on “Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials [inner ear balance control] in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome – Source: Journal of Laryngology and Otology, Feb 22, 2010”

  1. SeaVitality says:

    Quite interesting to see this new inner ear research. When I was living with the worst effects of CFS/Fibro, there would be quick dizziness if I closed my eyes in daylight or dark [in shower] and oddly, while outdoors walking with NO dizziness, there were three times when I lost my balance [after NOT tripping] and in slow motion, fell/rolled to the ground. The ND thought this might be of proprioceptive origin and once the higher dose of T4/T3 thyroid hormone was initiated the falling did stop. That being said, I still have intermittent and shooting pain in the R ear [not plugged/no illness] and if I physically overwork [time] or get too heated [weeding] there can be fleeting dizziness, although not right away [relative to BP adjustment or hypotension] but with later onset like the body [ears?] is/are having some difficulty in re-calibrating.

    Hmm, maybe not-so-coincidentally, it was long ago when I was 16 and after there had been a hugely stressful/early morning interface with my mom at-home that, soon after I got to school, I suddenly lost my balance, fell against the hall wall and slid to the floor while I did not lose consciousness. And when my mom took me in to the family MD, he could only surmise [in the 60’s] that that was as a result of ‘ear wax’ build-up. Of course, back then no one thought to check the Cortisol/DHEA, Thyroid/Adrenal hormones after such elevated emotional stress for the possibility of ‘deficiency’ which, in my later years, has been confirmed on all counts. So here’s a question: What is the symbiotic relationship between the ears and the HPA axis or, maybe the entire Endocrine System? Or, is this research only intending to address a structural issue while not speaking to what I have lived which does prompt me to believe there is plenty of hormone involvement.

    Please trust that I have long appreciated the bounty of information that is provided at this site which even includes the reader’s opportunity to provide ‘real life’ feedback, per chance it can be of meaningful assistance to others. Be well, everyone.

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