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Vitamins C and E associated with decreased inflammation in diabetics

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Reprinted with the kind permission of Life Extension.
 
December 30 2015. The November-December 2015 issue of Avicenna Journal of Phytomedicine published the finding of a trial conducted by Iranian researchers of anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin C and vitamin E in male diabetics. Elevated blood sugar in overweight diabetics results in higher levels of inflammation, which contributes to insulin resistance. According to authors Mostafa Jamlan and colleagues at Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, “It is possible to control insulin resistance and diabetes by modulating inflammatory cytokines and adipokines using chemical drugs or supplementary micronutrients.”
 
Eighty men with type 2 diabetes were randomized to receive 1000 milligrams ascorbic acid or 300 milligrams alpha-tocopherol daily for four weeks. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), leptin, serum amyloid A (SAA, expressed in the liver in response to inflammatory stimuli), insulin resistance and other factors were assessed before and after treatment.
 
At the end of four weeks, both groups experienced a similar decrease in TNF-?, SAA and hs-CRP, indicating a reduction in inflammation.  Leptin levels were also reduced in both groups. Vitamin C supplementation was associated with lowered insulin resistance and fasting insulin.
 
“To our acknowledge, this is the first report about effects of ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol on leptin level in type 2 diabetes patients,” the authors announce. They also observe that it is the first time that oral administration of vitamins C or E was shown to decrease serum leptin levels in diabetic subjects. (Diabetics become leptin resistant, thereby exhibiting higher than normal leptin levels.)
 
“According to the obtained results, it seems that ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol could induce inhibitory effects on inflammatory markers such as SAA, TNF-?, and leptin,” they conclude. “Therefore, oral consumption of ascorbic acid and alpha-tocopherol as anti-inflammatory agents could be beneficial for decreasing inflammation in type 2 diabetes patients.”

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