fbpx
Free U.S. Shipping on $75 Orders*

The problem of bias in behavioural intervention studies: Lessons from the PACE trial

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars ((3) votes, average 5.00 out of 5)
Loading...
SHARE THIS ARTICLE
By C. Wilshire
 
Abstract
 
Geraghty’s recent editorial on the PACE trial for chronic fatigue syndrome has stimulated a lively discussion. Here, I consider whether the published claims are justified by the data. I also discuss wider issues concerning trial procedures, researcher allegiance and participant reporting bias. Cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy had modest, time-limited effects on self-report measures, but little effect on more objective measures such as fitness and employment status. Given that the trial was non-blinded, and the favoured treatments were promoted to participants as ‘highly effective’, these effects may reflect participant response bias. In non-blinded trials, the issue of reporting biases deserves greater attention in future.

Source: Wilshire C. The problem of bias in behavioural intervention studies: Lessons from the PACE trial. J Health Psychol. 2017 Aug;22(9):1128-1133. doi: 10.1177/1359105317700885. Epub 2017 Mar 23.

share this article

share your comments

Enrich and inform our Community. Your opinion matters!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

ProHealth CBD Store