ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Is a Good Night's Sleep at the Top of Your Wishlist?

Ashwagandha Helps Hormones - Aids Arthritis

Why You Should Be Eating More Porcini Mushrooms

A Breathalyzer for Disease?

How Bacopa Can Help Improve Your Cognitive Function

Magnesium Reduces Diabetes and Helps Keep You Young

Lavender Aromatherapy Can Ease Pre-Op Anxiety

Give Your Health a Much-Needed Boost With Geranium

The Role of Resveratrol in Achieving Optimal Health

Could Coconut Oil Help Reduce Antibiotics?

 
Print Page
Email Article

BEING A LYME-LITERATE PATIENT DOESN’T MEAN YOU’RE A LYME-LITERATE DOCTOR. IT’S IMPORTANT TO KNOW THE DIFFERENCE

  [ 1 vote ]   [ 1 Comment ]
By Jennifer Crystal • www.ProHealth.com • November 5, 2017


Reprinted from GlobalLymeAlliance.org with the kind permission of Jennifer Crystal. To read the original article, click here.
 
Remember the old TV ad where the actor says, “I’m not a doctor, but I sometimes play one on TV”? Well, I’m not a doctor either, but sometimes I feel like I play one in real life.
 
I’ve become so well-versed in tick-borne diseases that I can distinguish between symptoms of Lyme and their co-infections; explain in scientific detail the issues with testing; talk biofilms and inflammatory cytokines and Herxheimer reactions. I have explained to actual doctors what it means when Lyme crosses the blood-brain barrier, why spirochetes evade antibiotics and how tick-borne illnesses affect acute infections. I know which blood tests I need to be ordered every month, and I can interpret the results.
 
I am Lyme-literate. But I am not a doctor. It’s important to remember the difference.
 
Anyone who has suffered from an illness for an extended period of time becomes knowledgeable about it. It’s a natural consequence of spending so much time in doctor’s offices and in bed. You get to know your symptoms—and the reasons behind them—because you’re living them first-hand. I consider this a positive effect of my illnesses, because I’m an informed healthcare consumer who can work with my doctors to make good decisions for my health. Moreover, I can help spread Lyme literacy by teaching others what I’ve learned.
 
The downside to this wisdom, though, is that we can start to view everything through the lens of our particular illness. Whenever someone tells me they have a rash, or flu-like symptoms, or idiopathic headaches, I immediately wonder, Could they have Lyme? We Lyme patients all know someone, either personally or in the public eye, who presents with what seem like Lyme symptoms, and we are sometimes too quick to share our opinion of the situation.
 
These people may very well have Lyme or some other tick-borne infection. I’ve had friends show me photos of bullseye rashes, or tell me stories of symptoms, and I’ve been able to point them to a Lyme-Literate Medical Doctor (LLMD) who has accurately diagnosed them with the disease I could only, as a non-doctor, suspect they had. It’s crucial for me to remember though that my role in that patient’s journey is simply to inform and where possible guide. Only an LLMD can make an actual diagnosis.
 
When one starts making blanket statements like “Oh you definitely have Lyme” or “That person doesn’t have Parkinson’s; it’s actually Lyme” one runs the risk of feeding into Lyme-related frenzy.  Someone who is new to Lyme recently asked whether LLMDs also feed that frenzy.
 
“Don’t they all just say everything is Lyme?” she asked me.
 
Well, no, they do not. A good LLMD will look at both test results and a clinical evaluation to assess whether a person is suffering from tick-borne illnesses or from something else, be it Parkinson’s, multiple sclerosis, or possibly an autoimmune disorder. A knowledgeable LLMD remembers his or her Hippocratic Oath: to admit when they don’t know, and to do no harm.
 
Lyme patients must do the same. It’s imperative that we help spread Lyme literacy. But we must tread carefully between offering educated advice and playing a role we’re not qualified to fill. Our illnesses are real. Let’s therefore stay true to our real-life duty as Lyme literate citizens: to help educate through our insight and experience, without trying to play the LLMD.

Jennifer Crystal is a writer and educator in Boston. She is working on a memoir about her journey with chronic tick-borne illness. Contact her at jennifercrystalwriter@gmail.com
 
 



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® FibroSleep™


Article Comments Post a Comment

Giving Lyme advice while not an LLMD
Posted by: LymeMom2
Nov 6, 2017
Your observation that Lyme patients are not LLMDs is correct. However, the reason Lyme sufferers find themselves giving medical advice to those who might have Lyme is that the medical profession has, for reasons too numerous to discuss here, abdicated its role in treating Lyme patients. And the US Govt. (CDC and NIH) has abdicated its role in informing the public about this dangerous disease(s). It is our concern for those who will probably not make their way to an LLMD without searching for years (and who may die before they get a correct diagnosis from IDSA types) that drives Lyme sufferers to be more forward in giving our opinions than we otherwise would be. The IDSA and CDC have arrayed their powers against the prevention of, research on, and cure for Lyme and other tick-borne illnesses, so Lyme sufferers feel they (somebody!) need to step into the vacuum created by these Lyme deniers. Lyme sufferers wouldn't previously have ventured an opinion about any other disease but, with Lyme, it's tragically, shamefully necessary.
Reply Reply
 
Optimized Curcumin Longvida with Omega-3

Featured Products

Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid

Natural Remedies

Restoring Gut Health: How to Create a Firewall Against Toxins Entering the Gut Wall Restoring Gut Health: How to Create a Firewall Against Toxins Entering the Gut Wall
Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function
Coping When Colds or Flu Catch Up with You Coping When Colds or Flu Catch Up with You
Joint Aches May Have Met Their Match in Curcumin Joint Aches May Have Met Their Match in Curcumin
Running on Empty? Fuel Up with NADH Running on Empty? Fuel Up with NADH

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map