ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Ultrasound Therapy for Fibromyalgia and Lyme Disease

Curcumin: The All In One Solution, Part 2

What Are the Benefits of Vitamin K2?

Vitamin D deficiency + high fat diet = metabolic syndrome

Why You Should Take Your Apple Cider Vinegar at Night

Use Burdock Oil to Promote Healthy Hair Growth

People with forms of early-onset Parkinson's disease may benefit from boosting niacin in diet, resea...

Meet Your Weight Loss Goals

AMA journal associates iron deficiency with hearing loss

Why the Mediterranean Diet Is so Successful

 
Print Page
Email Article

Insufficient evidence to deny antibiotic treatment to chronic Lyme disease patients – Source: Medical Hypotheses, Mar 4, 2009

  [ 21 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
By Daniel J Cameron • www.ProHealth.com • March 14, 2009


Background: The severity, length of illness, and cost of chronic Lyme disease (CLD) have been well described. A number of oral, intravenous, and intramuscular antibiotics have been prescribed for CLD.

Surprisingly few antibiotic schedules prescribed for the treatment of CLD have been evaluated in randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trials (RCTs). Physicians have increasingly turned to clinical treatment guideline (CPG) panels to judge the mixed results of the evidence.

Two CPG panels have looked at the evidence only to reach opposite conclusions:

(1) antibiotic therapy for CLD is not effective and

(2) antibiotic therapy for CLD is effective.

Physicians have been advised by guideline developers to use clinical discretion in diagnosing and treating CLD. Nevertheless, many health insurers - relying exclusively upon only one CPG - have a policy of automatically denying antibiotics to CLD patients regardless of the specifics of each case or the recommendations of the patient's physician.

Hypothesis: This paper examined the eight limitations of the evidence used to conclude that antibiotics therapy for CLD is not effective in forming the following hypothesis: insufficient evidence to deny antibiotic treatment to CLD patients.

Evidence for the Hypothesis: There are eight limitations that support the hypothesis:

(1) the power of the evidence is inadequate to draw definite conclusions,

(2) the evidence is too heterogeneous to make strong recommendations,

(3) the risk to an individual of facing a long-term debilitating illness has not been considered,

(4) the risk to society of a growing chronically ill population has not been considered,

(5) treatment delay has not been considered as a confounder,

(6) co-infections have not been considered as a confounder,

(7) the design of RCTs did not address the range of treatment options in an actual practice, and

(8) the findings cannot be generalized to actual practice.

Implications of the Hypothesis: This hypothesis suggests that physicians should consider the limitations of the evidence before denying antibiotic treatment for CLD.

Physicians who deny antibiotic treatment to CLD patients might inform their patients that there are some clinicians who disagree with that position, and then offer to refer them for a second opinion to a doctor who could potentially present a different point of view.

The hypothesis also suggests that health care insurers should consider the limitations of the evidence before adopting policies that routinely deny antibiotic treatment for CLD patients and should expand coverage of CLD to include clinical discretion for specific clinical situations.

Source: Medical Hypotheses, Mar 4, 2009. PMID: 19268485, by Cameron DJ, First Medical Associates, Medicine, Mount Kisco, New York, USA. [E-mail: Cameron@LymeProject.com]





Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function

Natural Remedies

Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function
Vitamin E: Super Antioxidant We Only Thought We Knew Vitamin E: Super Antioxidant We Only Thought We Knew
Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones
Astaxanthin - A Little-Known but Power-Packed Nutrient Astaxanthin - A Little-Known but Power-Packed Nutrient
Milk Thistle: Trusted Support for Health & Healing in a Toxic World Milk Thistle: Trusted Support for Health & Healing in a Toxic World

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map