ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Can Autoimmune Conditions be Reversed? Researchers Make a Surprising Discovery

Scientifically-designed fasting diet lowers risks for major diseases

How One Tiny Molecule Turned into One Huge Health Breakthrough

Acupuncture boosts effectiveness of standard medical care for chronic pain, depression

Research on Astaxanthin Demonstrates Significant Whole Body Benefits

Humans have three times more brown body fat

Nutrients Boost Stem Cell Function

B12 Proven Essential for Every Cell

Soy isoflavones may benefit breast cancer patients

Dietary prebiotics improve sleep, buffer impacts of stress, says study

 
Print Page
Email Article

University of Melbourne scientists have found clues to why patients with insulin-dependent diabetes are often unable to sense their need to take life-saving glucose

  [ 7 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • September 27, 2002


The evidence came from a known and potent appetite stimulant released by the brain called Neuropeptide Y (NPY). Studies using diabetic rats have shown the NPY levels in the brains of diabetic rats differ significantly to those of normal rats under conditions of low glucose.

It was known that specific nerves in the brain sense the levels of glucose in the body.

"But how these nerves operate and how the brain tells us we need to eat or we are full, which can help maintain glucose levels, has remained a mystery. Understanding these mechanisms is a major goal of diabetes research," says University of Melbourne pharmacologist Associate Professor Margaret Morris who led the research.

"Our research has provided some insight into these mechanisms and should lead to a better understanding and, ultimately, management of diabetes and hypoglycemia, the life threatening condition faced by diabetics when their blood glucose gets too low," she says.

The study is published in the latest edition of Diabetologia and is supported by the US-based Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the world's largest funder of research into diabetes.

Previous clinical research had shown that a long-term program of multiple daily insulin injections can protect against the complications of type-1 diabetes such as blindness and kidney failure. The aim of the program is to drive down the high blood glucose levels, characteristic of diabetes, closer to that of non-diabetic individuals.

Normally we keep a relatively constant level of blood glucose by the pancreas constantly adjusting the amount of insulin it releases. A diabetes, blood sugar can only be controlled by injections of insulin. This causes a series of highs and lows in blood glucose. The problem with such an intensive program of insulin injection is that the lows experienced can often be too low placing the person at risk of hypoglycemia.

Studies have shown that people with repeated exposure to hypoglycemic conditions become desensitised to the body's triggers that inform us we are in this predicament. In the case of NPY, this trigger would be the desire to eat, which would restore blood sugar levels.

The University of Melbourne study compared diabetic and normal rats' brain responses after periods of low glucose, and then tested their ability to recover upon return to normal glucose levels.

The production of NPY in diabetic rats fell significantly during the period of low glucose. In contrast, the NPY levels in the normal rat remained unchanged.

A second approach looked at the levels of NPY in response to injections of insulin. This time the effects in the two groups were opposite. The normally high NPY levels in the diabetic rat decreased, while normally low NPY levels in the normal rat increased.

"As insulin lowers the blood glucose levels, a response that would normally trigger the desire to eat, it is strange that the NPY levels in diabetic rats drop, an effect that would normally suppress the need to eat," says Morris.

"We know that NPY is linked to the brains ability to sense and control the body's levels of glucose. Our task now is to understand NPY's exact role, why it differs in diabetes, what nerves are involved and what, if any, other sensory nerves and stimulants are involved," she says.

JDRF has just provided an additional US$55,000 to fund this research.



More information


Dr Margaret Morris
Department of Pharmacology
The University of Melbourne
Telephone +(61 3) 8344 5745
E-mail mjmorris@unimelb.edu.au

Jason Major
Media officer, Communications and Marketing
The University of Melbourne
Telephone +(61 3) 8344 0181 or 0421 641 506
Fax +(61 3) 9349 4135
E-mail jmajor@unimelb.edu.au



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Ultra ATP+, Double Strength

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function

Natural Remedies

Help for Soreness and Swelling: What Do Silkworms Have to Do With It? Help for Soreness and Swelling: What Do Silkworms Have to Do With It?
When a Negative is Positive - Goodnighties Recovery Sleepwear When a Negative is Positive - Goodnighties Recovery Sleepwear
Priming Your Immune System for Cold & Flu Season Priming Your Immune System for Cold & Flu Season
Breakthrough Form of Magnesium Enhances Memory and Cognitive Function Breakthrough Form of Magnesium Enhances Memory and Cognitive Function
The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map