ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Fighting Heartburn and Gerd Naturally – And Safely!

Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function

Natural Bladder Control, Go Less and Live More

Top Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies — Are You at Risk?

Trimming the spare tire: Canola oil may cut belly fat

How Pomegranate May Protect Against Cancer

Omega Fix for Obesity: How the Right Fats Fight Fat

Curcumin Reverses the Cellular Damage of Chronic Stress

The Onion: Cancer Fighter and Food Preserver

Probiotics improve cognition in Alzheimer's patients

 
Print Page
Email Article

Small Head Size and Genes are Factors in Alzheimer's Disease

  [ 36 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • October 29, 2001




The risk of developing Alzheimer's disease may be increased for people with small head sizes, and for those who also carry an Alzheimer's-related gene. This is according to a study published in the October 23 issue of Neurology, the scientific journal of the American Academy of Neurology.

People with small head size and the gene variant apolipoprotein E e4 (ApoE e4) are 14 times more likely to develop Alzheimer's disease than people without that combination. Having a small head size without the gene did not significantly increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's. This result adds weight to the theory that having a large "brain reserve" protects against Alzheimer's.

"The theory is that the symptoms appear when the loss of brain cells goes below a critical threshold of brain reserve," said Amy Borenstein Graves, PhD, of the University of South Florida in Tampa, who conducted the study with researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle. "People with ApoE e4 are likely to have more rapid brain cell damage. Those with large brain reserves may have the same changes in their brains, but they don't show symptoms of the disease until much later."

The study involved 1,869 healthy Japanese Americans age 65 and older in King County, Washington. Study participants were divided into three groups, based on head circumference. Only the group with the smallest head circumference (less than 21.4 inches), and ApoE e-4, had a significantly greater risk of Alzheimer's. The study participants were followed for an average of 3.8 years. During that time, 59 people developed Alzheimer's disease. Those who developed Alzheimer's were also older, less educated, shorter, lighter and had lower estimated verbal IQ (intelligence quotient) scores than those who did not develop Alzheimer's during the study period.

Borenstein Graves said that while brain growth is controlled in part by genetics, it may also be influenced by factors during the first 10 years of life, such as malnutrition, poverty, infection, parental occupation and educational status, family size and birth order.

Later in life, factors such as higher education and income and mental and physical exercise may play a role in delaying the onset of Alzheimer's disease.

"It's interesting to speculate on whether we could prevent this disease if we could systematically boost our brain reserves throughout life," Borenstein Graves said. "In our study 18 percent of the risk of Alzheimer's was attributable solely to small head size. So if it were possible to increase brain reserve through prevention of brain damage that occurs across the life span, nearly 20 percent of the disease among these individuals might be preventable."

Borenstein Graves said a limitation of the study is its sample population of only Japanese Americans, which makes it difficult to apply the results to the general population.

"However, several studies with other populations have shown a relationship between head circumference and cognition and rates of developing Alzheimer's," she said.

The study was supported by the National Institute on Aging.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Vitamin D3 Extreme™


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils

Natural Remedies

Olea25 Olive Hydroxytyrosol Hits Astonishing 68,000+ ORAC Antioxidant Value Olea25 Olive Hydroxytyrosol Hits Astonishing 68,000+ ORAC Antioxidant Value
Optimize Your Immune System Naturally: Thymic Protein A Optimize Your Immune System Naturally: Thymic Protein A
Fighting Fatigue with Ground-breaking French Oak Wood Extract Fighting Fatigue with Ground-breaking French Oak Wood Extract
Green Coffee Extract: Unique Obesity Intervention Green Coffee Extract: Unique Obesity Intervention
Three-Step Strategy to Reverse Mitochondrial Aging Three-Step Strategy to Reverse Mitochondrial Aging

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map