ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

SURVEY: Cognitive Impairment II

Top 3 Nutrients to Detox the Liver and Soothe Digestion

Natural Bladder Control, Go Less and Live More

Top Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies — Are You at Risk?

Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function

Omega Fix for Obesity: How the Right Fats Fight Fat

How Pomegranate May Protect Against Cancer

Potential of Quercetin in the Treatment of Melanoma

Trimming the spare tire: Canola oil may cut belly fat

Supplementation with vitamins C and E associated with decreased risk of cognitive impairment, dement...

 
Print Page
Email Article

Increased Estrogen Levels Do Not Correlate with Changes in Cognition

  [ 161 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • February 21, 2003


In confirmation of previous research, and contrary to findings from two recent studies, scientists at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) School of Medicine have shown that increased levels of estrogen do not correlate with changes in cognitive functioning in postmenopausal women with Alzheimer's disease.

The new study, published in the February issue of the American Medical Association's Archives of Neurology, found that elevations in hormone levels did not predict cognitive test scores nor other neuropsychological measures in 120 women with Alzheimer's disease who were given various levels of Premarin, a hormone-replacement therapy that raises the levels of the hormones estradiol and estrone.

Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia in the United States, affecting approximately 4 million individuals, and occurs with a higher frequency in women. Although some physicians believed that women with Alzheimer's disease who took estrogen experienced improved cognition, three studies in 2000 showed no correlation between estrogen and cognitive improvement. One of those was a multi-center trial published in the Journal of the American Medical Association by the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study, directed by Leon Thal, M.D., UCSD professor of neurosciences and a neurologist with the San Diego VA Healthcare System.

Recently, however, two small clinical trials (with 12 and 20 women) had different results. Investigators reported that higher doses of estrogen, delivered in patch form, improved attention and verbal memory in the two small groups of women.

"In order to investigate an association between estradiol and estrone levels and measures of cognitive function, we studied 120 postmenopausal women with Alzheimer's disease over a one-year period," Thal said. "We attained the same high levels of hormone that the two small clinical trials attained, but our larger study showed no improvement in cognition."

Of the 120 women, 39 received a placebo, 42 received 0.625 mg of Premarin, and 39 were given 1.25 mg of Premarin. Throughout the 12-month period, blood samples were drawn to assess estradiol and estrone levels. Participants also took several tests to determine the relationship between a change in hormone levels and a change in cognition. These included seven selected neuropsychological measures as well as cognitive tests such as the Mini-Mental State Exaination (MMSE), the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive (ADAS-Cog), and the Clinical Demential Rating (CDR) Scale.

The study was funded by the National Institute on Aging, with Premarin provided by Wyeth-Ayerst. In addition to Thal, authors were Michael Grundman, M.D., MPH, and Ronald G. Thomas, Ph.D., UCSD; Ruth Mulnard, R.N., DNSc, University of California, Irvine; Mary Sano, Ph.D., Sergievsky Center, Columbia University, New York; and Lon Schneider, M.D., Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Vitamin D3 Extreme™


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function

Natural Remedies

Health Benefits Are Brewing in Green Tea Health Benefits Are Brewing in Green Tea
Aching Muscles? Top 10 Nutrients to Take Back Your Life Aching Muscles? Top 10 Nutrients to Take Back Your Life
The Fast-Acting Solution for Healthy Digestive Function The Fast-Acting Solution for Healthy Digestive Function
The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS
Optimize Your Immune System Naturally: Thymic Protein A Optimize Your Immune System Naturally: Thymic Protein A

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map