ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Curcumin: The All In One Solution, Part 2

CoQ10 — A Nutritional Powerhouse for Mitochondrial Health

How to Prevent Hearing Loss and Improve Your Hearing With Nutrition

What Are the Benefits of Vitamin K2?

Vitamin D deficiency + high fat diet = metabolic syndrome

Use Burdock Oil to Promote Healthy Hair Growth

Why You Should Take Your Apple Cider Vinegar at Night

AMA journal associates iron deficiency with hearing loss

Lutein linked to preservation of crystallized intelligence

Zinc eaten at levels found in biofortified crops reduces 'wear and tear' on DNA

 
Print Page
Email Article

Cholesterol Lowering Drugs Shown to Decrease Predictor of Alzheimer's Disease

  [ 97 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • April 21, 2003


Cholesterol-lowering medications known as statins also play an important role in reducing levels of a strong predictor of Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from UT Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas researchers.

In today's issue of the Archives of Neurology, UT Southwestern researchers report that participants who took statins lowered their brain cholesterol levels by 21.4 percent. Brain cholesterol is involved in the formation of amyloid plaques, one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Amyloid plaques are waxy buildups that harm brain cells.

"This class of drugs may be potentially beneficial in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease," said Dr. Gloria Vega, professor of clinical nutrition and the study's lead author.

"If we limit cholesterol synthesis in the brain, we may be able to decrease the production of amyloid plaques. The findings from this research provide information about the safety and efficacy of a reasonable dose of a statin on the reduction of brain cholesterol."

There is currently no cure for Alzheimer's disease, which affects four million Americans. But this study, UT Southwestern researchers said, suggests that reducing cholesterol in the brain also can reduce plaque formation, thereby potentially reducing the severity of Alzheimer's disease.

"We've shown that you can take people with Alzheimer's disease, with normal cholesterol levels, and reduce the amount of cholesterol that their brain produces without any adverse side effects," said Dr. Myron Weiner, vice chairman of clinical services in psychiatry and a co-author of the study. The study included 44 Alzheimer's patients, none with cardiovascular disease. The study participants were randomly assigned to receive either 40 milligrams per day of lovastatin, simvastatin or pravastatin, or one gram per day of extended-release niacin (another cholesterol-lowering medication) for a six-week period.

Unlike dietary cholesterol, which is transported to the liver and excreted through the bile, the brain gets rid of cholesterol by first converting it into 24S-hydroxycholesterol, which is elevated in individuals with Alzheimer's disease. The researchers measured, through blood samples, the amount of 24S-hydroxycholesterol to determine how much cholesterol was expelled from the brain.

All three statins reduced levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol by at least 20 percent, while 24S-hydroxycholesterol levels dropped by 10 percent with extended-release niacin.

"It would be interesting to determine whether a combination of a statin and extended-release niacin has an additive effect on levels of 24S-hydroxycholesterol," said Vega.

Weiner is the lead study investigator at UT Southwestern for the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative Study, a National Institute on Aging multicenter study, which is evaluating whether statins play a role in slowing the progression of Alzheimer's. Results from that study are expected in the next two years.

"Now that we've shown that statins safely and effectively reduce levels of brain cholesterol, we are studying what statins do cognitively for people with Alzheimer's," he said.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
FibroSleep™ Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Energy NADH™ 12.5mg

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils

Natural Remedies

The Surprising Benefits of Probiotics - What You Didn't Know The Surprising Benefits of Probiotics - What You Didn't Know
Priming Your Immune System for Cold & Flu Season Priming Your Immune System for Cold & Flu Season
"It's Not Easy Being Green" - But It Is Healthy
Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones
Coconut Oil - Healthy Gifts from the 'Tree of Life' Coconut Oil - Healthy Gifts from the 'Tree of Life'

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map