ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Fighting Heartburn and Gerd Naturally – And Safely!

Vital Molecule Increases Cellular Energy and Improves Cognitive Function

Natural Bladder Control, Go Less and Live More

Top Vitamin and Mineral Deficiencies — Are You at Risk?

Trimming the spare tire: Canola oil may cut belly fat

How Pomegranate May Protect Against Cancer

Omega Fix for Obesity: How the Right Fats Fight Fat

Curcumin Reverses the Cellular Damage of Chronic Stress

Probiotics improve cognition in Alzheimer's patients

The Onion: Cancer Fighter and Food Preserver

 
Print Page
Email Article

Testosterone May Protect Against Alzheimer's

  [ 152 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • January 27, 2004


Researchers Caution: It Is too Early to Recommend Testosterone Therapy for Prevention of Alzheimer' Disease By Salynn Boyles
WebMD Medical News  Reviewed By Brunilda Nazario, MD on Monday, January 26, 2004 Jan. 26, 2004 --

The evidence is mounting that testosterone may protect men against developing Alzheimer's disease, and now some experts say it may be time for hormone therapy trials to help answer the question once and for all. A newly published government study links low levels of the male sex hormone as early as a decade before a diagnosis of Alzheimer's with an increased risk for the disease.

Researchers with the National Institute on Aging (NIA) say their findings show testosterone protects the aging brain from dementia. But they add that it is far too soon to recommend testosterone therapy for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease. "There are a lot of concerns about using these supplements," investigator Susan Resnick, PhD, tells WebMD. "Many, many men in the United States are using them, but we have very little information on safety and health outcomes."

Modest Risk Reduction Resnick and NIA colleagues evaluated testosterone levels over time in 574 men participating in a large ongoing aging study. Using stored blood samples, the researchers were able to identify testosterone levels measured over an average of almost 20 years. Fifty-four of the men developed Alzheimer's disease during the study. Although testosterone levels fell over time in all men as they aged, these levels dropped more precipitously in men who later developed the disease. At the end of the study, men with Alzheimer's disease had, on average, about half the levels of testosterone as men without age-related dementia.

The researchers measured 'free' testosterone, which is the active form of the hormone in the body. For every 10-point increase in testosterone level, there was a 26% decrease in the risk of Alzheimer's disease. This was true even after adjusting for the effect of age, level of education, and other factors that may increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. "The strength of this study was that we could go back as long as 10 years prior to a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and show that men with higher levels of free testosterone are less likely to develop the disease," Resnick says.

Prevention Trials The findings are published in the Jan. 27 issue of the journal Neurology. In the same issue, researchers from Italy reported that lean male and female Alzheimer's patients had low levels of free testosterone when compared with the control group. Editorialists question whether it is time for testosterone prevention trials in men. More than 1.7 million prescriptions for testosterone were written in the United States in 2002, representing a 30% increase over 2001 and a 170% increase over 1999, according to figures from the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine. Older men are increasingly taking the hormone in an effort to stop the clock and prevent conditions associated with aging, even though the medical evidence for this is weak.

Last November, an Institute of Medicine task force came out against large-scale testosterone prevention trials similar to the estrogen replacement therapy trials in women. Instead, the group recommended smaller trials involving only older men who had been diagnosed with low testosterone and who are not at high risk for prostate cancer. Just as long-term estrogen replacement therapy in older women has been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, there are concerns that men who take testosterone may be increasing their prostate cancer risk.

Alzheimer's expert Samuel Gandy, MD, PhD, says the hope is that scientists will develop a "designer" testosterone that would target the brain and not affect other organs, in the same way the designer estrogen-like compounds, such as Raloxifene (Evista), targets the bones to prevent osteoporosis. "Theoretically we could develop a designer estrogen or testosterone that could be protective against dementia," he says.

The Alzheimer's Association spokesman, who runs the Farber Institute for Neurosciences at Philadelphia's Thomas Jefferson University, says the long-term risks vs. benefits of taking testosterone to prevent dementia will not be known until clinical trials are completed. "Until that happens there is no medical justification for taking testosterone to lower the risk of Alzheimer's," he says. "The data just aren't there to support that as a recommendation."

SOURCES: Moffat et al. Neurology, Jan. 27, 2004; vol 62: pp 188-193. Paoletti et al. Neurology, Jan. 27, 2004; vol 62: pp 301-303. Institute of Medicine press release on testosterone trials, November 2003. Susan M. Resnick, PhD, National Institute on Aging, Baltimore, Md. Samuel Gandy, MD, PhD, spokesman, Alzheimer's Association; professor of neurology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia; director, Farber Institute. © 2003 WebMD Inc. All rights reserved.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
Natural Pain Relief Supplements

Featured Products

Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor® Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®
Reduce Fatigue up to 45%
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health
Ultra ATP+, Double Strength Ultra ATP+, Double Strength
Get energized with malic acid & magnesium
FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid

Natural Remedies

Enhance Eyelashes Naturally Enhance Eyelashes Naturally
The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS The Crucial Role CoQ10 Plays in Fibromyalgia and ME/CFS
Coping When Colds or Flu Catch Up with You Coping When Colds or Flu Catch Up with You
Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones Strontium - The Missing Mineral for Strong Bones
Top 3 Nutrients to Detox the Liver and Soothe Digestion Top 3 Nutrients to Detox the Liver and Soothe Digestion

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2016 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map