ProHealth health Vitamin and Natural Supplement Store and Health
Home  |  Log In  |  My Account  |  View Cart  View Your ProHealth Vitamin and Supplement Shopping Cart
800-366-6056  |  Contact Us  |  Help
Facebook Google Plus
Fibromyalgia  Chronic Fatigue Syndrome & M.E.  Lyme Disease  Natural Wellness  Supplement News  Forums  Our Story
Store     Brands   |   A-Z Index   |   Best Sellers   |   New Products   |   Deals & Specials   |   Under $10   |   SmartSavings Club

Trending News

Can Autoimmune Conditions be Reversed? Researchers Make a Surprising Discovery

Scientifically-designed fasting diet lowers risks for major diseases

How One Tiny Molecule Turned into One Huge Health Breakthrough

Acupuncture boosts effectiveness of standard medical care for chronic pain, depression

Research on Astaxanthin Demonstrates Significant Whole Body Benefits

Humans have three times more brown body fat

Nutrients Boost Stem Cell Function

B12 Proven Essential for Every Cell

Soy isoflavones may benefit breast cancer patients

Dietary prebiotics improve sleep, buffer impacts of stress, says study

 
Print Page
Email Article

Long-Distance Command Sends Human Growth Hormone into Action

  [ 21 votes ]   [ Discuss This Article ]
www.ProHealth.com • February 14, 2002




(Philadelphia, PA) -- Scientists have long sought to determine what agent controls the production of the human growth hormone hGH, which is vital for proper physical development.

Now, in findings that point toward an eventual gene therapy for the type of dwarfism that results when the pituitary gland is unable to manufacture the hormone, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found the mechanism that sets hGH in action. In addition, they've discerned an unusual pattern of activation in which the key mechanism operates by remote control. Their research will appear in the Friday, February 15, issue of the journal Molecular Cell. Working with transgenic mice, the Penn researchers were able to pinpoint the activation mechanism at location called hypersensitive site 1 (HS1), within the "locus control region" 15 kilobases from the hGH gene. A kilobase is a measurement representing a unit of nucleic acid. Within the microscopic realm of cells, this activation is the equivalent of unlocking the front door of a house from seven buildings away. "What we found is surprising because most genes are controlled by a promoter element adjacent to the gene, or within the gene's proximity. But in the case of this human growth hormone, the controlling mechanism is so far away there is an intervening gene between hGH and the activation site," said Stephen Liebhaber, MD, Professor of Genetics and Medicine. He is corresponding author for the study along with Nancy Cooke, MD, Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism.

The human gene cluster containing hGH includes five separate human growth genes, four of which have importance during fetal development. Only the gene hGH functions following birth, and is necessary for normal growth: Without it, humans develop a condition called pituitary dwarfism, in which their physical stature never reaches five feet.

Liebhaber, Cooke and their colleagues at Penn have been researching hGH in a series of studies and were the first to demonstrate that, unlike most hormones, hGH cannot be "turned on" merely by activating a nearby promoter element. In the present study, they've established that activating HS1 triggered a series of enzymatic changes spanning the layer of proteins and DNA (chromatin) that separate the hypersensitive activation site from the hormone promoter, eventually affecting the promoter, and ultimately opening the growth hormone itself.

"The modifications migrate through the chromatin in some way that we do not yet understand," Cooke said. Added Liebhaber, "Now we're studying the mechanism through which this signal spreads." Yugong Ho, PhD, the lead author on the paper, and Felice Elefant, PhD, both post-doctoral fellows at Penn, worked with Liebhaber and Cooke on the research.


The study was funded by the National Institutes of Health's National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.



Post a Comment

Featured Products From the ProHealth Store
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Mitochondria Ignite™ with NT Factor®

Looking for Vitamins, Herbs and Supplements?
Search the ProHealth Store for Hundreds of Natural Health Products


Article Comments



Be the first to comment on this article!

Post a Comment


 
NAD+ Ignite with Niagen

Featured Products

FibroSleep™ FibroSleep™
The All-in-One Natural Sleep Aid
Vitamin D3 Extreme™ Vitamin D3 Extreme™
50,000 IU Vitamin D3 - Prescription Strength
Ultra EPA  - Fish Oil Ultra EPA - Fish Oil
Ultra concentrated source of essential fish oils
Energy NADH™ 12.5mg Energy NADH™ 12.5mg
Improve Energy & Cognitive Function
Optimized Curcumin Longvida® Optimized Curcumin Longvida®
Supports Cognition, Memory & Overall Health

Natural Remedies

When a Negative is Positive - Goodnighties Recovery Sleepwear When a Negative is Positive - Goodnighties Recovery Sleepwear
Breaking Through the Mental Fog Breaking Through the Mental Fog
Breakthrough Form of Magnesium Enhances Memory and Cognitive Function Breakthrough Form of Magnesium Enhances Memory and Cognitive Function
Block Acid Reflux to Prevent Esophageal Problems! Block Acid Reflux to Prevent Esophageal Problems!
Aches and Pains? A Simple Solution You'll Love Aches and Pains? A Simple Solution You'll Love

CONTACT US
ProHealth, Inc.
555 Maple Ave
Carpinteria, CA 93013
(800) 366-6056  |  Email

· Become a Wholesaler
· Vendor Inquiries
· Affiliate Program
SHOP WITH CONFIDENCE
Credit Card Processing
SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTERS
Get the latest news about Fibromyalgia, M.E/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Lyme Disease and Natural Wellness

CONNECT WITH US ProHealth on Facebook  ProHealth on Twitter  ProHealth on Pinterest  ProHealth on Google Plus

© 2017 ProHealth, Inc. All rights reserved. Pain Tracker App  |  Store  |  Customer Service  |  Guarantee  |  Privacy  |  Contact Us  |  Library  |  RSS  |  Site Map