Abstract: Epstein-Barr virus-induced changes in B-lymphocyte gene expression

J Virol 2002 Oct;76(20):10427-36 Related Articles, Links  Carter KL, Cahir-McFarland E, Kieff E.  Departments of Medicine and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Harvard Medical School, and The Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.

To elucidate the mechanisms by which Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency III gene expression transforms primary B lymphocytes to lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), the associated alterations in cell gene expression were assessed by using 4,146 cellular cDNAs arrayed on nitrocellulose filters and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). A total of 1,405 of the 4,146 cDNAs were detected using cDNA probes from poly(A)(+) RNA of IB4 LCLs, a non-EBV-infected Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell line, BL41, or EBV latency III-converted BL41 cells (BL41EBV). Thirty-eight RNAs were consistently twofold more abundant in the IB4 LCL and BL41EBV than in BL41 by microarray analysis.

Ten of these are known to be EBV induced. A total of 23 of 28 newly identified EBV-induced genes were confirmed by real-time RT-PCR.

In addition, nine newly identified genes and CD10 were EBV repressed. These EBV-regulated genes encode proteins involved in signal transduction, transcription, protein biosynthesis and degradation, and cell motility, shape, or adhesion. Seven of seven newly identified EBV-induced RNAs were more abundant in newly established LCLs than in resting B lymphocytes. Surveys of eight promoters of newly identified genes implicate NF-kappaB or PU.1 as potentially important mediators of EBV-induced effects through LMP1 or EBNA2, respectively. Thus, examination of the transcriptional effects of EBV infection can elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which EBV latency III alters B lymphocytes.

PMID: 12239319 [PubMed – in process]

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