Interstitial Cystitis Prognosis Generally Worse in ME/CFS Patients

Article:
Prognostic factors for recent-onset interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome
– Source: British Journal of Urology International (BJUI), Aug 9, 2012

By John W Warren, Daniel J Clauw, Patricia Langenberg

[Note: IC/PBS is frequently diagnosed in ME/CFS patients (and fibromyalgia patients as well); though within the large IC/PBS patient population those with ME/CFS are considered a relatively small subset.]

Abstract:
Study Type: Prognosis (case series)

Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) comprises pain perceived to be from the bladder, urinary urgency and frequency, and nocturia.

As diagnosed at present, it is primarily identified in adult women. It is a chronic disease yet its natural history has not been well studied.

In a prospective study of 304 incident female IC/PBS cases followed for a median of 33 months after onset, women with baseline chronic fatigue syndrome had a worse prognosis for IC/PBS.

Mild IC/PBS at baseline was the only variable that was directly associated with a good prognosis.

Objective: To identify baseline variables that predict the prognosis of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) in women seeking medical care for recent onset of this syndrome.

Subjects and Methods:

In a prospective study of women with incident IC/PBS (12 months or less of symptoms), we contacted patients at intervals and asked standardized questions about IC/PBS symptoms in the previous week.

Logistic regression analyses assessed baseline variables as predictors of mild vs more severe IC/PBS at the last follow-up.

Results:

Median length of follow-up was 33 months after onset of IC/PBS; 304 (97%) patients had at least one follow-up assessment.

• Mild IC/PBS at baseline was the only variable that was directly associated with a mild IC/PBS endpoint.

• Conversely, a history of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) was inversely associated with a mild endpoint of IC/PBS (i.e. individuals with CFS had a worse prognosis for their IC/PBS symptoms).

Conclusions:

• At a median of nearly 3 years after onset, baseline mild IC/PBS was directly associated with a milder disease severity.

• Baseline co-morbid CFS was associated with more severe disease.

Source: British Journal of Urology International (BJUI), Aug 9, 2012. Warren JW, Clauw DJ, Langenberg P. Department of Medicine Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; Departments of Anesthesiology and Medicine, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.

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