Isoflavones Reduce Breast Cancer Risk?

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UTRECHT, The Netherlands–

Soy isoflavones have been shown to reduce breast cancer in laboratory studies and epidemiologic studies, particularly those involving Asian women, who tend to have a much higher daily soy intake. However, in a recent study of European women, researchers found no protective effect of soy isoflavones in reducing breast cancer risk

The study was published in February’s issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (79, 2:282-8, 2004) (www.ajcn.org). Approximately 15,500 Dutch women (between the ages of 49 and 70) who were free of breast cancer at the start of the study were involved in the five-year Dutch cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Subjects’ dietary phytoestrogen intake was measured and evaluated each year. A total of 280 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during the follow-up period. The average daily intake of isoflavones was 0.4 mg and the average daily intake of lignans was 0.7 mg. Researchers found no significant difference in breast cancer risk between women with the highest intake of isoflavones and lignans compared to women with the lowest intake. “The results of the present study, which focused on Western women whose habitual diet is low in phytoestrogens, showed no protective effects of isoflavones or lignans against breast cancer,” wrote the researchers.

When the study was compared to a population-based, prospective cohort study of Japanese women, the opposite effect was found. Researchers found a positive correlation between intake of soy isoflavones and reduced breast cancer risk (J Natl Cancer Inst (95, 12:906-13, 2003) (jncicancerspectrum.oupjournals.org/jnci). The women consumed miso soup and soy foods on a regular basis, helping to increase and maintain higher levels of isoflavones, when compared to most women in the Western world who generally don’t consume as much.

Source: Isoflavones Reduce Breast Cancer Risk? Posted on: 02/23/2004

UTRECHT, The Netherlands–

Soy isoflavones have been shown to reduce breast cancer in laboratory studies and epidemiologic studies, particularly those involving Asian women, who tend to have a much higher daily soy intake. However, in a recent study of European women, researchers found no protective effect of soy isoflavones in reducing breast cancer risk

The study was published in February’s issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (79, 2:282-8, 2004) (www.ajcn.org). Approximately 15,500 Dutch women (between the ages of 49 and 70) who were free of breast cancer at the start of the study were involved in the five-year Dutch cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Subjects’ dietary phytoestrogen intake was measured and evaluated each year. A total of 280 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during the follow-up period. The average daily intake of isoflavones was 0.4 mg and the average daily intake of lignans was 0.7 mg. Researchers found no significant difference in breast cancer risk between women with the highest intake of isoflavones and lignans compared to women with the lowest intake. “The results of the present study, which focused on Western women whose habitual diet is low in phytoestrogens, showed no protective effects of isoflavones or lignans against breast cancer,” wrote the researchers.

When the study was compared to a population-based, prospective cohort study of Japanese women, the opposite effect was found. Researchers found a positive correlation between intake of soy isoflavones and reduced breast cancer risk (J Natl Cancer Inst (95, 12:906-13, 2003) (jncicancerspectrum.oupjournals.org/jnci). The women consumed miso soup and soy foods on a regular basis, helping to increase and maintain higher levels of isoflavones, when compared to most women in the Western world who generally don’t consume as much. Isoflavones Reduce Breast Cancer Risk?

Posted on: 02/23/2004

UTRECHT, The Netherlands–

Soy isoflavones have been shown to reduce breast cancer in laboratory studies and epidemiologic studies, particularly those involving Asian women, who tend to have a much higher daily soy intake. However, in a recent study of European women, researchers found no protective effect of soy isoflavones in reducing breast cancer risk

The study was published in February’s issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (79, 2:282-8, 2004) (www.ajcn.org). Approximately 15,500 Dutch women (between the ages of 49 and 70) who were free of breast cancer at the start of the study were involved in the five-year Dutch cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Subjects’ dietary phytoestrogen intake was measured and evaluated each year. A total of 280 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during the follow-up period. The average daily intake of isoflavones was 0.4 mg and the average daily intake of lignans was 0.7 mg. Researchers found no significant difference in breast cancer risk between women with the highest intake of isoflavones and lignans compared to women with the lowest intake. “The results of the present study, which focused on Western women whose habitual diet is low in phytoestrogens, showed no protective effects of isoflavones or lignans against breast cancer,” wrote the researchers.

When the study was compared to a population-based, prospective cohort study of Japanese women, the opposite effect was found. Researchers found a positive correlation between intake of soy isoflavones and reduced breast cancer risk (J Natl Cancer Inst (95, 12:906-13, 2003) (jncicancerspectrum.oupjournals.org/jnci). The women consumed miso soup and soy foods on a regular basis, helping to increase and maintain higher levels of isoflavones, when compared to most women in the Western world who generally don’t consume as much. Isoflavones Reduce Breast Cancer Risk?

Posted on: 02/23/2004

UTRECHT, The Netherlands–

Soy isoflavones have been shown to reduce breast cancer in laboratory studies and epidemiologic studies, particularly those involving Asian women, who tend to have a much higher daily soy intake. However, in a recent study of European women, researchers found no protective effect of soy isoflavones in reducing breast cancer risk

The study was published in February’s issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition (79, 2:282-8, 2004) (www.ajcn.org). Approximately 15,500 Dutch women (between the ages of 49 and 70) who were free of breast cancer at the start of the study were involved in the five-year Dutch cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. Subjects’ dietary phytoestrogen intake was measured and evaluated each year. A total of 280 women were diagnosed with breast cancer during the follow-up period. The average daily intake of isoflavones was 0.4 mg and the average daily intake of lignans was 0.7 mg. Researchers found no significant difference in breast cancer risk between women with the highest intake of isoflavones and lignans compared to women with the lowest intake. “The results of the present study, which focused on Western women whose habitual diet is low in phytoestrogens, showed no protective effects of isoflavones or lignans against breast cancer,” wrote the researchers.

When the study was compared to a population-based, prospective cohort study of Japanese women, the opposite effect was found. Researchers found a positive correlation between intake of soy isoflavones and reduced breast cancer risk (J Natl Cancer Inst (95, 12:906-13, 2003) (jncicancerspectrum.oupjournals.org/jnci). The women consumed miso soup and soy foods on a regular basis, helping to increase and maintain higher levels of isoflavones, when compared to most women in the Western world who generally don’t consume as much.

Source: Natural Products Industry Insider

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