Plasma vitamin B12 status and cerebral white matter lesions – Source: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Oct 31, 2008

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (21 votes, average: 3.25 out of 5)
Loading...

[Note: Homocysteine – an amino acid in the blood that at high levels is associated with damage to the inner lining of arteries, blood clots – is strongly influenced by diet as well as genetic factors. Folic acid and B vitamins help break it down, according to the American Heart Association.]

Background and Objective: Elevated homocysteine has been associated with higher prevalence of cerebral white matter lesions and infarcts [areas of tissue death due to local lack of oxygen], and worse cognitive performance.

This raises the question whether factors involved in homocysteine metabolism, such as vitamin B12, are also related to these outcomes. We examined the association of several markers of vitamin B12 status with cerebral white matter lesions, infarcts, and cognition.

Methods: We evaluated the association of plasma [blood] concentrations of vitamin B-12, methylmalonic acid, holotranscobalamin, and transcobalamin saturation with cerebral white matter lesions and infarcts at baseline and cognition at baseline and during follow-up among 1,019 non-demented elderly participants of the population-based Rotterdam Scan Study. Analyses were adjusted for several potential confounders, including homocysteine and folate concentration.

Results:

• Poorer vitamin B12 status was significantly associated with greater severity of white matter lesions, in particular periventricular white matter lesions, in a concentration-related manner. [Periventricular refers to the area surrounding the brain’s fluid-filled cavities or “ventricles.”]

• Adjustment for common vascular risk factors (including blood pressure, smoking, diabetes, and intima media thickness) did not alter the associations.

• Adjustment for homocysteine and folate modestly weakened the associations.

• No association was observed for any of the studied markers of vitamin B12 status with presence of brain infarcts and baseline cognition or cognitive decline during follow up.

Conclusion: Our results indicate that vitamin B12 status in the normal range is associated with severity of white matter lesions, especially periventricular lesions. Given the absence of an association with cerebral infarcts, we hypothesize that this association is explained by effects on myelin integrity in the brain rather than through vascular mechanisms. [Myelin is the insulating lining of nerve fibers, which aids in quick and accurate transmission of electrical current/messages between nerve cells.]

Source: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Oct 31, 2008. [E-pub ahead of print] PMID: 18977824, de Lau L, Smith D, Refsum H, Johnston C, Breteler MM. Erasmus Medical Centre, Netherlands. [E-mail: m.breteler@erasmusmc.nl]

Related articles

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars (21 votes, average: 3.25 out of 5)
Loading...



2 thoughts on “Plasma vitamin B12 status and cerebral white matter lesions – Source: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry, Oct 31, 2008”

  1. KathyNC says:

    My name is Kathy Hatfield and I am the primary caregiver for my 80 year old Dad who has Alzheimer’s disease and lives with me in North Carolina.

    I am writing a daily blog on my caregiver website that shows the lighter side of caring for someone with dementia. There is also lots of information about dementia and caregiving, as well as a LIVE CHAT every Tuesday night at 7:00 p.m. Eastern time for caregivers who need support, but cannot attend a “live” support group.

    Please pass this link along to anyone you feel would enjoy it.

    http://www.KnowItAlz.com

    Thanks,
    Kathy

  2. KathyNC says:

    My name is Kathy Hatfield and I am the primary caregiver for my 80 year old Dad who has Alzheimer’s disease and lives with me in North Carolina.

    I am writing a daily blog on my caregiver website that shows the lighter side of caring for someone with dementia. There is also lots of information about dementia and caregiving, as well as a LIVE CHAT every Tuesday night at 7:00 p.m. Eastern time for caregivers who need support, but cannot attend a “live” support group.

    Please pass this link along to anyone you feel would enjoy it.

    http://www.KnowItAlz.com

    Thanks,
    Kathy

Leave a Reply