Prostaglandin D synthase concentration in cerebrospinal fluid & serum of patients with neurological disorders

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Prostaglandin D synthase (PGD synthase) or beta-trace protein is a
major constituent of human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)
representing-3% of the total CSF protein. We have recently
developed a highly specific immunofluorometric assay for PGD
synthase, which enabled us to quantify the presence of PGD
synthase in fluids and tissues not associated with the CNS. In
this report we provide quantitative data of the presence of
PGD synthase in CSF and serum from 302 subjects with various
neurological diseases and symptoms. PGD synthase levels in CSF
are approximately 35-fold higher than those of serum, with a
median concentration of 11,299 micrograms/L. A statistically
significant association of PGD synthase concentration in CSF
was observed with both patient age and gender. There was no
correlation between PGD synthase concentration in serum and
patient age or gender.

To evaluate the clinical utility of PGD synthase in diagnosing neurological
diseases, the distributionpattern of PGD synthase in CSF and serum was
examined for each neuropathology of 268 patients whose diagnosis was
known. No statistical difference was observed between PGD synthase
concentration in the CSF (129 cases) or the serum (94 cases)
of multiple sclerosis afflicted subjects in comparison to all
other patients studied. The distribution pattern was also not
different for PGD synthase levels in CSF of patients with
HIV/AIDS related neuropathies, viral meningitis and
fibromyalgia. We conclude that PGD synthase measurement
presents no clinical utility in diagnosing neurological
disorders in adulthood. PGD synthase may have a physiological
and/or pathological role in the developing brain and in
neurodegenerative diseases.

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